The Bull Calf

Reviews of Fiction, Poetry, and Literary Criticism

2015 Reviewers

Zachary Abram is a doctoral candidate in English/Canadian Studies at the University of Ottawa. His dissertation traces the representation of the soldier in Canadian war fiction. His written work has appeared in Studies in Canadian Literature, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada, The Dalhousie Review and others.

 

Marie-Claude Béland est titulaire d'un baccalauréat en études littéraires de l'Université Laval et d'une maîtrise en traduction de l'Université de Montréal. Ses études et son travail de traductrice l'ont menée à porter un intérêt particulier au phénomène du bilinguisme et au dialogue entre le français et l'anglais à Montréal.

 

 

Sarah Bezan is a doctoral candidate enrolled in The University of Alberta’s Department of English and Film Studies.  Her doctoral thesis, “Posthuman Postmortalities: The Human and Animal Carcass in Contemporary Fiction and Film” is funded by a SSHRC Canada Graduate Scholarship.  Sarah is also a Sessional Lecturer in The University of Winnipeg’s English Department and a contributor to Mosaic, the Journal for Critical Animal Studies, the Journal of the African Literature Association, and Criterion.  

David Boucher est doctorant au Département des littératures de langue française à l'Université de Montréal, où il enseigne aussi comme chargé de cours. Ses recherches actuelles portent sur les représentations du futur et du totalitarisme dans le roman d'anticipation français et québécois contemporain (Michel Houellebecq, Maurcie G. Dantec, Nelly Arcan, Antoine Volodine).

 

Nicholas Bradley is the William Lyon Mackenzie King Research Fellow at Harvard University and an associate professor in the Department of English at the University of Victoria. He is the editor of We Go Far Back in Time: The Letters of Earle Birney and Al Purdy, 1947–1987 (Harbour Publishing, 2014).

 

 

Carmen Broder is a recent MA graduate at the University of Alberta. She is originally from Calgary, AB but is making Vancouver, BC her homestead for now. She is a freelance writer with an interest in popular culture and digital humanities. She "wrote" her first "book" when she was five.

 

 

Gediminas Dainius holds a BA in Honours English and Creative Writing from Concordia University, where he is currently completing his MA in English. His research interests include violent masculinity and the perseverance of the frontier myth in contemporary American fiction.

 

Melissa Dalgleish is the Program Coordinator for the Research Training Centre at The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute and a PhD candidate in English at York University. She co-edits the #Alt-Academy project Graduate Training in the 21st Century, which focuses on the changing nature of graduate education, and writes for the feminist academic blog Hook & Eye. She primarily researches and writes about the myth-obsessed poets and theorists whose work dominated Canadian literature in the 1950s and 60s.  

 

Joel Deshaye is an assistant professor at Memorial University. His articles and reviews have appeared in various Canadian and international journals. He is the author of The Metaphor of Celebrity: Canadian Poetry and the Public, 1955-1980 (2013)

 

Christopher Doody is a PhD candidate in the department of English at Carleton University. His dissertation is a literary history of the Canadian Authors Association from 1921-1960. He has published articles on Douglas Coupland’s Generation X, and on Amazon’s advertisement of the Kindle.

 

 

Alana Fletcher is a doctoral candidate in the department of English Language and Literature at Queen’s University. Her dissertation looks at the ways in which adaptations of a particular set of oral histories have garnered remedial attention for a major instance of environmental injustice in Canada’s North. Alana’s work has appeared or is forthcoming in SCL, Canadian Literature, PBSC, Victorian Review, and elsewhere.

Patricia Godbout is a professor of translation and comparative Canadian literature at the Université de Sherbrooke. Her main area of research is the history of literary translation in Canada. She recently co-edited the literary correspondence between Louis Dantin and Alfred DesRochers (Fides, 2014), and Anne Hébert’s « Dialogue sur la traduction » with F. R. Scott (PUM, 2013). She is also a literary translator.

 

 

Phil Hall’s most recent books are Guthrie Clothing, the Poetry of Phil Hall, a Selected Sequence (Wilfred Laurier University Press, 2015) and My Banjo and Tiny Drawings (Flat Singles Press, 2015). He is Poetry Editor at BookThug, and lives near Perth ON.

 

Photo Credit: Mark Goldstein

Graham Jensen is a PhD candidate at Dalhousie University, where he also holds a PhD Stipend from Editing Modernism in Canada as Principal Investigator of the Canadian Modernist Magazines Project (currently under development). His most recent publication, on Louis Dudek, appeared in Canadian Poetry: Studies, Documents, Reviews. His dissertation will explore unorthodox expressions of faith in mid-twentieth century Canadian poetry.

 

 

Joseph Kidney, originally from New Westminster, BC, is an MA student at McGill University, specializing in Shakespeare. His poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in The New Quarterly and Vallum. He is a poetry editor for Scrivener Creative Review.

 

Zane Koss is a doctoral candidate at New York University and studies poetry since the Second World War. He is a recent graduate of the Master's of English Literature program at McGill University, where his research focused on the intersections between experimental poetics and experimental politics in Louis Dudek's 1950s poetry. He has been previously published in Poetry is Dead, CV2 and the Bull Calf Review.

 

Michelle LeDonne holds an MA in English Literature from McGill University, where she wrote a research paper on Lady Gaga and self-reflexive representations of celebrity.

 

 

Joelle Levesque lives in Montreal where she is working towards the completion of an M.A. in Creative Writing at Concordia University. Her academic research and personal writing is motivated by an interdisciplinary interest in art, psychology, ecology, and cultural studies. Although literature is her fondest friend, music is her greatest pleasure.

 

 

Jessi MacEachern is a PhD student at the Université de Montréal, where she is writing on the influence of Anglo-American women modernists on contemporary Canadian feminist poetry. She has previously been published in CV2, Matrix, and Lemon Hound.

 

 

Kaarina Mikalson is a Master’s student in the department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta. Her thesis examines constructions of gender in Canadian fiction from the Great Depression. She is Project Manager for Canada and the Spanish Civil War and a research assistant for the Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory.

 

 

Nick Milne is a part-time professor and full-time doctoral candidate in the Department of English at the University of Ottawa.  His research focuses on the intersections of literary scholarship and historiography in the study of the First World War.  He is a regular contributor to the University of Oxford’s Centenary blog, WW1C, and has been featured in documentary programs on BBC Radio 3 and 4.

 

 

 

Lizy Mostowski recently earned her Master’s in English Literature from Concordia University where she was the Miriam Aaron Roland Fellow at Concordia’s Institute for Canadian Jewish Studies. Her poetry and fiction have previously appeared both in print and online publications including The Center for Fiction’s The Literarian. Her current research interests include Holocaust Literature, Canadian Jewish Literature, the autobiography genre, and Polish-Jewish identity narratives.

 

David R. Pitt was born in St. John’s, Newfoundland and currently lives in Montreal with his beautiful wife. He is an English MA student at McGill University, his main areas being Early Modern English literature and Milton studies.

 

 

 

Ryan Porter is a Professor of Technical Communication at Algonquin College in Ottawa. He received his Ph.D. from Queen's University and wrote his dissertation on small-town Ontario literature. His articles and reviews have appeared in a number of Canadian and international journals.

 

 

Matthew Redmond is a PhD student at Stanford University. He currently studies influence, intertextual discourse, and meta-spectacle in nineteenth century literature, with a particular focus on Dickens' novels. Matthew is also a covert Miltonist and an admirer of postwar Canadian prose.

 

 

 

Dale Tracy has her PhD from Queen's University and currently teaches modern and contemporary literature at the Royal Military College of Canada. She is interested in compassion and sentimentality in contemporary literature and culture. Her articles and reviews can be found in Canadian Literature, English Studies in Canada, Popular Music, MaComère, and The Teaching Professor.

 

 

Paul Watkins teaches English at Vancouver Island University. Check out his website at: pauldbwatkins.com.

 

 

 

Carl Watts is a PhD candidate at Queen’s University, where he is writing a dissertation on national and ethnic identities in Canadian literature. His academic writing has most recently appeared in Studies in Canadian Literature, and his poetry has been featured in The Best Canadian Poetry 2014. He also holds a PhD Stipend from Editing Modernism in Canada, and is currently at work on a digital edition of Laura Goodman Salverson’s The Dove (1933).

 

Kailin Wright is an Assistant Professor in the English Department at St. Francis Xavier University. Her research focuses on race, gender, and sexuality in Canadian literature and theatre. Her work on Canadian drama has appeared in Studies in Canadian Literature and Theatre Research in Canada. Kailin is a Co-Applicant of the Editing Modernism in Canada (EMiC) project (funded by a Strategic Knowledge Cluster grant), and she is currently creating a scholarly edition of Carroll Aikins’s play The God of Gods (1919).